AGENT ORANGE / HERBICIDES

 

Agent Orange Legacy - Public  http://www.agentorangelegacy.us/agentorangelegacy.html 

Agent Orange Legacy - Support Group   http://agentorangelegacy.ning.com/

Quilt of Tears  http://www.agentorangequiltoftears.com/index.html

 

The Silver Rose Award
consists of a Certificate, Award Card, Poster and
Medal with an Orange and White neck-drape Ribbon.

 
Silver Rose Plaque
The special Plaque may be purchased by anyone for any recipient of the Silver Rose Award(including for yourself) or as an 'In Memoriam' for family members or friends.
 
 
Silver Rose Monument
Place a Silver Rose Monument in Your Community
 
 
Silver Rose Merchandise
Various Silver Rose Merchandise Which Can Be Purchased
 

 

Jeff Miller
Committee ON Veterans’ Affairs
One Hundred Twelfth Congress
335 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515


Dear Mr. Miller:

The tracking of cancer in the aging population of Vietnam Veterans exposed to dioxin has been neglected. With pancreatic and brain cancer rates 5 to 7 times higher than the civilian populations and lung cancer twice the rate in veterans that served in country according to the mortality study issued by The Department of Veterans’ Affairs Canberra Nov. 1997. The VA and statistical communities do not track or have registries specific to the veteran population. In fact the VA is not required to report cancer to the Nation Cancer Institute’s Surveillance Epidemiology End Result or SEER, the Nation’s statistical tracking program for cancer. Delayed or under reporting of cancer by the VA makes it difficult to know the accurate rate and type of cancer occurring in the Vietnam veteran population, a population that was exposed to the deadly toxic Agent Orange between 1962 through 1975. When cancer is reported by the VA to central registries the cancer at times has been found to be miscoded. The reason for withholding this critical information according to the VA is due to concerns of privacy. This under reporting and miscoding results in our Nation’s veterans not getting the service connected benefits rightfully due to them when they are diagnosed with cancer caused by exposure to Agent Orange. An easy and inexpensive way to track cancer in veterans is through social security numbers.

The Institute of Medicine provides information and advice concerning health and science policy for the VA routinely uses studies from The Veterans’ Affairs Canberra in its Agent Orange report. In an email I received form Aaron Schneiderman director of the VA’s epidemiology department the VA is not tracking the rate of brain cancer in Vietnam Veterans. The windows and families of www.vietnamveteranwives.org are asking the Veteran’s Affairs to track and report all cancers to the SEER and to service connect all cancers that are a result of Agent Orange exposure. I am requesting a meeting with you to present my overwhelming evidence.


Sincerely,
Eileen Whitacre
Agent Orange Liaison
Vietnam Veteran Wives
http://www.vietnamveteranwives.org/

 

Just to pass this along in case you didn't already know.

Diabetes Melliyus Type II (adult onset) has been linked to Agent Orange exposure. Vietnam veterans exposed to AO who have this diabetes  can file a claim for service connection.

 

My friend, Steve Burns, has so graciously allowed me to present some of his excellent work here on my website.  Everything in the section below is his work.  We hope that many veterans and their families will be helped by what is found here.   Steve has put many long hours into putting these resources together.   To view this complete page of information and also many others on Steve's website, please visit 'Veterans Information' at www.veteransinfo.org

You Can Contact Steve Here: snakecharmer550@yahoo.com 

Here are more of the places where Steve helps others:

 

THANK YOU STEVE!!!

 

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Breaking News: Long Awaited Dioxins Report Revealed

EPAs Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments, Volume 1

The American People's Dioxin Report

Service connection for bladder cancer, as due to Agent Orange exposure and/or diesel fuel exposure, is granted.

Exposure to Agent Orange by Location

Click here to see herbicide spraying locations between 1963 and 1970

Vietnam the Secert Agent

Click pic for info
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For further info go here.
 

Agent Orange is recognized as the most toxic man-made chemical. We dumped it on Vietnam and we dumped it on the dusty backroads of Southern Missouri.

Vietnam: The Secret Agent is the first comprehensive look at the history, the effects and the implications of the deadly contaminant 2,4,5-T — a main ingredient of the defoliant code-named Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. Using rare archival and striking war footage in support of interviews with veterans, scientists, attorneys and representatives of the U.S. Air Force, the VA and Dow Chemical — this film documents the history of chemical warfare and the plight of our Vietnam vets.

Every issue raised in the film continues to resonate in today's political climate. As soldiers return from Iraq and Afghanistan, plagued by illness, disability and post-traumatic stress, as Americans — particularly students — question political decisions, it's critical to learn from past conflicts.

This award winning 1984 documentary classic, re-released on DVD, is loaded with new bonus interviews: class action update, eye witness accounts from Vietnam, dioxin problem solving, U.S. veterans today, and more.

Guam and Johnston Atoll

Vietnam and Southeast Asia Documents

Click pic for the Warning
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Beyond The Wall

The POW/MIA Scrolling Wall

Click This Pic
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Filing Claims for Presumptive Conditions Based on Herbicide Exposure

Agent Orange Exposure Commonly Linked to Cancer & Endocrine Disorders

Agent orange development procedures for in country-brown water-blue water-korea-thailand

Cancer and Diabetes Findings in Veterans of Ranch Hand Reevaluated

Diabetes and Cancer in Veterans of Operation Ranch Hand After Adjustment for Calendar Period, Days of Spraying, and Time Spent in Southeast Asia

Searchable dioxin study database

Free I Served Sticker

Ischemic Heart Disease

New Procedures for Claims Based on Herbicide Exposure in Thailand and Korea

Agent Orange Okinawa

Free PDF's on what we call AO

Check Your Claims Status On Line

Agent Orange Legacy-Children of Vietnam Veterans

Agent Orange Second Generation

A G E N T O R A N G E & O T H E R D E F O L I A N T S

VA - Birth Defects Assistance

Vietnam Veteran Wives

Vocational Training for Children with Spina Bifida or Other Birth Defects

Children of Women Vietnam Veterans Health Care Program

Click the pic to find names by states
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Wall Updates in Excel

If You Had Malaria In Vietnam, Then You Need To Read This

What If I Was Exposed to an Herbicide Outside Vietnam?

AO Peripheral Neuropathy Claims Help

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Vietnam War: -- The Impact Of Media

T H E V I E T N A M W A R

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If you are a Vietnam Veteran and have not gotten diabetes, PLEASE get checked out for it every SIX MONTHS. While you are at it, if you have not had your Thyroid checked PLEASE DO, and make sure you get your Doctor to check it EVERY TWELVE MONTHS.
 
Every Vietnam Veteran should have a  yearly physical with cat scans.
   
DON'T BE ANOTHER VICTIM OF, IT WILL NEVER HAPPEN TO ME!!!!!!

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Parkinson Disease

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Vietnam Conflict July 1, 1958 to August 4, 1964
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Vietnam War August 5, 1964 to May 7, 1975

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Agent Orange Quilt of Tears Schedule

View this montage created
                                    at One True Media
The Quilts 4/19-4/20

To View Videos Of Vietnam

The below zip file is for you to download to your computer to have and use, it is a rather large file..2.9mb

Zip File Of The 58181 Names On The Wall

click pic for link
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To Join AO Awareness and Information Yahoo Group--Click The Pic

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The Complete Agent Orange Story
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View this montage created
                                    at One True Media
Agent Orange Quilt Of Tears

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What is Agent Orange

The Rainbow Herbicides

The Fifteen Herbicides Used in Vietnam

  • PURPLE: A formulation of 2,4,-D and 2,4,5,-T used between 1962 and 1964.
  • GREEN: Contained 2,4,5-T and was used 1962-1964.
  • PINK: Contained 2,4,5-T and was used 1962-1964.
  • ORANGE: A formulation of 2,4,-D and 2,4,5-T used between 1965 and 1970.
  • WHITE: A formulation of Picloram and 2,4,-D.
  • BLUE: Contained cacodylic acid.
  • ORANGE II: A formulation of 2,4,-D and 2,4,5-T used in 1968 and 1969 (also sometimes referred to as "Super Orange")
  • DINOXOL: A formulation of 2,4,-D and 2,4,,5-T. Small quantities were tested in Vietnam between 1962 and 1964.
  • TRINOXOL: Contained 2,4,5-T. Small quantities tested in Vietnam 1962-1964.
  • BROMACIL
    • DIQUAT:
    • TANDEX:
    • MONURON:
    • DIURON:
    • DALAPON:

Small quantities of all of the above were tested in Vietnam, 1962-1964.

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Agent Orange Gagetown, New Brunswick, Canada

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Chemicals used in Military Operations during the Vietnam War

Durway Proving Ground

National Toxicology Program

Nehmer Rule Title 38 CFR

Veterans Health Council

Vietnam War Bibliography

Loophole Frustrates Veterans

Found this on page 14 of this Agent Orange Review
 http://www1.va.gov/agentorange/docs/ID_AO_July_2001.PDF
 
If it is determined that a veteran was exposed outside
 Vietnam during his or her military service, to a chemical
 contained in one of the herbicides used in Vietnam, and
 he or she has a disease on VA¢s presumptive list, it will be
 presumed to be service connected.

The next 4 links is new info on Hatfield reports, they are large files in PDF

Hatfield Report Final Nov 2009

Hatfield- Hot Spots South Vietnam

Hatfield Report April 2007

Hatfield Report Summary April 2007

Agent Blue, used almost as much as Agent Orange in Vietnam, contained a highly concentrated form of arsenic.
The next 3 links are about AB.

Agent Blue

Agent Blue 2

Agent Blue 3

Agent White

Agent Orange and Agent Purple

Agent Orange Cambodia

Agent Orange Clinic

Agent Orange Johnston Atoll

Agent Orange Press Release

Agent Orange Philippines

Agent Orange Queensland

Agent Orange Registry

A Vietnam Wife

Air America

BPH and Low Testosterone Levels

Birth Defects in Vietnam Veterans and Returning Gulf War Veterans

Cancer and Diabetes findings in Veterans of Ranch Hand reevaluated

Characterizing Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam: Interim Findings and Recommendations Read Online

Chemical Toxins

CIA Documents On Vietnam

Court: VA must pay Agent Orange victims July 19, 2007

Darrow Report

Dioxins and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

Dioxin from Science.Gov Type in Dioxin in Their Search Box

Eagle's Bravo 2/27 Wolfhounds

Emerging Links between Chronic Disease and Environmental Exposure

EPA and Dioxin/AO Reports

Establishing Service Connection for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Herbicide Agents

Guide to Filing Claims for Agent Orange

Hatfield Reports and Presentations

HERBICIDAL WARFARE PROGRAM IN VIETNAM, 1961 - 1971

How Agent Orange Worked

New On AO

New Revised Agent Orange Handbook 9/05/06 AO Registry

Prostate Cancer Research

Research on Vietnam

Self Help Guide On Agent Orange

Stellman Study

Stellman Study 2

The Political Science of Agent Orange and Dioxin

The PTSD Book

VA Lists many new ailments as "no relationship" to Agent Orange

Veterans and Agent Orange: updated January 16, 2007

DISEASES RECOGNIZED BY THE VA AS CONNECTED TO AGENT ORANGE EXPOSURE

Veterans Service Officers

VA Forms for Compensation

Vietnam War Resources

Vietnam War History

Wildgun's Diabetic Info Site

Women Veterans and Their Courage!

Institute of Medicine Agent Orange Reports

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Agent Orange Information
 
This list is intended to help those who are researching Agent Orange and the problems it is causing to their family members due to the
spraying during the Vietnam War and other locations

Agent Orange and Blue Water Navy Updates

Agent Orange Briefs

Agent Orange and Cancer

Agent Orange Classified Info Zumwalt Report

More on Zumwalt

Agent Orange General Info

Agent Orange and Your VA Claim

Agent Orange and COPD 1

Agent Orange and COPD 2

Agent Orange and COPD 3

Agent Orange and COPD 4

Agent Orange Cover-up: Dioxin KILLS Web Site

Agent Orange by Deana Feist

Agent Orange and Diabetes

Agent orange and Diabetes 2

Agent Orange and Dow Chemical

Agent Orange Exam

Agent Orange and High Blood Pressure

AGENT ORANGE Law Suite

Agent Orange Lawyer

Agent Orange and Multiple Sclerosis

AGENT ORANGE Outside of Vietnam, Canada:

Agent Orange Outside Vietnam, Panama

Agent Orange Panama

Agent Orange Panama 2

AGENT ORANGE Quilt of Tears

Agent Orange and Peripheral Neuropathy

Agent Orange Review

Agent Orange and Spina Bifida

Agent Orange Terminology

Air Force Admits Agent Orange Spraying at Eglin AFB, Florida

Alvin Young Pages

American Legion Service Officers

AO Spray Map & Info "Must See

AO Spray Map II

Agent Orange Story

Agent Orange Story in PDF

Agent Orange, VA Claims and Appeals, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder,

Agent Orange Wildgun

Article on Defoliation

Autoimmune Dysfunction In Vietnam Veterans

Children of Women Vietnam Veterans

Collateral Damage (2006)

Compensation & Pension Benefits

Cyber Sarge's Site

Determining Agent Orange Exposure

Dioxin Briefing Sheet

Dioxin Homepage

Dioxin Report

DoD Medical Research

Disabled American Veterans Service Office Directories DAV Excel Format

Diseases Associated With AO

Exposure to dioxins influences male reproductive system, study of Vietnam veterans concludes

Federal Benefits for Veterans and Dependants 2008

Gallons of Agent Orange, White & Blue Sprayed in Nam,

Gary Jacobson Vietnam Picture Tour

Information on Prostate Cancer

IOM Health Of Veterans

IOM Identifies Link with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Principi Extends Benefits

List of Media Coverage for Hatfield Consultants Ltd. Studies on Agent Orange in Viet Nam

Maps of Nam

Military Base Pollution Clark Air Base

Monsanto's Agent Orange

MORE info on AO Chemicals

MORE Problems Caused by AGENT ORANGE

National Personnel Records Center, Military Personnel Records Web Site

Operation Ranch Hand

Prostate Cancer Foundation

POW/MIA Databases and Documents

POW/MIA Through DNA

Search The Wall

Search the Wall 2

Seveso Studies on Early and Long-Term Effects of Dioxin Exposure

Social Security Online

Social Security Disability Secrets

Social Security Disability Information

Spina Bifida Handbook

Supreme Court's Decision on AGENT ORANGE "June 2002"

Thesis on Agent Orange by Deana Feist

The Suicide Wall

The Veterans Consortium Pro Bono Program

U.S. Senate

U.S. House of Representatives

VA Forms

VA's guide on Agent Orange claims

Veterans Administration & Benefits

Veterans Benefits for those exposed to Agent Orange

Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange

Vets Home

Veterans With Diabetes

Vietnam Veterans Benefit From Agent Orange Rules

VFW Veterans Service Officers

VFW National Veterans Service Program Roster

Veterans Health Initiative (VHI) Agent Orange

Veterans online application web site (VONAPP)

Vietnam Casualties by State and City or Town

Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) of 1974

Vietnam, Still at odds (2005)

Vietnam War Resources

Viper Vietnam Pages

Virtual Vietnam Archive

BOOKS / STUDIES on Agent Orange

ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry). 1998.
Toxicological profile for chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (Update). US
Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service.
Atlanta, Georgia. 678 p. with appendices.

ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry). 1997.
Interim Policy Guideline: Dioxin and Dioxin-like compounds in soil.
US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service.
Atlanta, Georgia.

Dioxins and Health. Arnold Schecter (ed.). New York, NY: Plenum
Press, 1994. ISBN: 0-306-44785-1.

Dioxin and its Analogues, Joint Report No. 4. Academie Des Sciences -
CADAS. Paris: Technique & Documentation - Lavoisier, 1995. ISBN: 2-
7430-0020-1.

Harvest of Death. J.B. Neilands, G.H. Orians, E.W. Pfeiffer, A.
Vennema, and A.H. Westing. New York, NY: The Free Press, 1972.
Library of Congress Number: 72-143521.

Herbicidal Warfare: The RANCH HAND Project in Vietnam. Paul F.
Cecil. New York, NY: Praeger Publishers, 1986. ISBN: 0-275-92007-0.

My Father, My Son. E. Zumwalt Jr., E. Zumwalt III, and J. Pekkanen.
New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1986. ISBN: 0-02-633630-8.

The Wages of War: When American Soldiers Came Home - From Valley
Forge to Vietnam. R. Severo and L. Milford. New York, NY: Simon &
Schuster Inc., 1989. ISBN: 0-671-54325-3.

The Withering Rain. Thomas Whiteside. New York, NY: E.P. Dutton &
Co. Inc., 1971. Library of Congress Number: 77-148477.

After Tet: The Bloodiest Year in Viet Nam. Ronald H. Spector. The
Free Press, New York. 1993. ISBN: 0-02-930380-X

In Retrospect - The Tragedy and Lessons of Viet Nam. Robert S.
McNamara. Random House, New York. 1995. ISBN: 0-8129-2523-8.

Veterans and Agent Orange. Committee to Review the Health Effects in
Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides, Division of Health
Promotion and Disease Prevention, Institute of Medicine. Washington,
D.C.: National Academy Press,
1994. ISBN: 0-309-04887-7.
1996 Update: ISBN: 0-309-05487-7.
1998 Update: ISBN: 0-309-06326-4.
2000 Update: ISBN: 0-309-07552-1.

VIETNAM: A History. Stanley Karnow. New York, NY: The Viking Press,
1983. ISBN: 0-670-74604-5.

Hamburger Hill. Samuel Zaffiri. Presido Press, Norato, Ca. 1988. New
edition printed 2000. ISBN: 0-89141-289-1.
Herbicides in War - The Long-term Ecological and Human Consequences.
A.H. Westing (ed.). Taylor and Francis, Philadelphia. 1984. ISBN: 0-
85066-265-6.

WHO/EURO. 1998a. WHO Revises the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for
dioxins. World Health Organization European Centre for Environment
and Health; International Programme on Chemical Safety.
Organohalogen Compounds 38: 295-298.

WHO/EURO. 1998b. Assessment of the Health Risk of Dioxins: Re-
evaluation of the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI). World Health
Organization, European Centre for Environment and Health;
International Programme on Chemical Safety. WHO Consultation, May 25-
29, 1998, Geneva, Switzerland.

WHO/EURO. 1991. Consultation on Tolerable Daily Intake from Food of
PCDDs and PCDFs, Bilthoven, Netherlands, 4-7 December 1990. Region
Office for Europe Summary Report. EUR/ICP/PCS 030(S)0369n. World
Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen.


WHO/EURO. 1989. Levels of PCBs, PCDDS and PCDFs in Breast Milk:
Results of WHO-coordinated interlaboratory quality control studies
and analytical field studies (Yrjanhaiki, EJ, ed).
Environmental Health Series Report #34.

Copenhagen: World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe.
WHO/EURO. 1988. PCBs, PCDDs and PCDFs in Breast Milk:

Assessment of health risks (Grandjean, P et al., eds.).
Environmental Health Series Report #29. Copenhagen:
World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe.


Australian Vietnam Veterans Study

This 1997 study of 50,000 Australian Viet Nam veterans
entitled "Mortality of Vietnam Veterans: The Veteran Cohort Study"
found that the death rate among veterans between 1980 and 1994 was
some seven percent higher than for the overall male population. In
addition, the study found that the death rate from cancer was about
20 percent above average, and that veterans may face an increased
risk of death by suicide. The Australian government received this
information seriously since it has been documented that those
individuals who were in Viet Nam had successfully passed rigid
medical examinations and were therefore considered
"healthy"; those with congenital medical issues were rejected as
conscripts.

The report is available from:
Commonwealth Department of Veterans' Affairs
PO Box 21
Canberra, ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA

 

Agent Orange Presumptive List Expanded

BY LEONARD J. SELFON, VETERANS BENEFITS PROGRAM

Pursuant to the Agent Orange Act of 1991, the VA entered into an agreement with the

National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to review the scientific associations between

exposure to herbicides during the Vietnam War and diseases suspected to result from

such exposure. NAS submits reports on its activities every two years.

The law also provides that when, based on sound medical and scientific evidence, the VA

determines that a positive association exists (i.e., the credible evidence for the association

is equal to or outweighs the credible evidence against the association), the VA will publish

regulations establishing presumptive service connection for that disease, (i.e., the

veteran will not have to provide medical evidence of a relationship between exposure and

the subsequent onset of the disease in question). The Secretary's determination must be

based on a consideration of the NAS reports and all other available sound medical and

scientific information and analysis.

Between July 1993 and April 2001, the VA issued regulations that established

presumptive service connection for several diseases for Vietnam veterans. These include:

chloracne, Type II diabetes mellitus, Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin's

lymphoma, acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy, porphyria cutanea tarda, prostate

cancer, respiratory cancers (cancer of the lung, bronchus, larynx, or trachea), and certain

soft-tissue sarcomas. If a veteran who was exposed to an herbicidal agent in service

subsequently develops one of the presumptive diseases, the VA will presume that the

disease was caused by the exposure to that herbicide for purposes of granting serviceconnected

benefits.

In each of its four previous biennial reports, the NAS determined that there was

"inadequate/insufficient" evidence to determine an association between exposure to an

herbicide agent and the development of leukemia. Following the 2001 NAS report, the VA

asked NAS to review the possible association between exposure to Agent Orange and a

particular form of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In its 2002 update, NAS

concluded that there is sufficient evidence of such an association. After considering all of

the evidence, VA Secretary Principi determined that there is a positive credible association

between exposure to herbicides used in Vietnam and the subsequent Occurrence of CLL

and that a presumption of service connection for CLL is warranted.

Consequently, on March 26 the VA published a proposed regulation to add CCL to the list

of presumptively service-connected diseases incurred as the result of exposure to

herbicides used in the Vietnam War. Interested organizations and individuals have until

late May to provide their comments on the proposed regulation. The VA will then consider

all of the comments received and issue a final regulation.

USE OF AGENT ORANGE OUTSIDE OF VIETNAM

The VA has announced that the Defense of Department (DoD) has released a list of

locations outside of Vietnam where Agent Orange was used or tested over a number of

years. The listings are mostly Army records, although there are a limited number of Navy

and Air Force records. These listings relate only to chemical efficacy testing and/or

operational testing. The records, however, do not refer to the use of Agent Orange or

other chemicals in routine base maintenance activities, such as spraying along railroad

tracks, weed control on rifle ranges, etc. The VA has been advised that information on

such use does not exist.

The VA does have significant information regarding Agent Orange use in Korea along the

demilitarized zone (DMZ). DoD has confirmed that Agent Orange was used from April 1968

through July 1969 along the DMZ. The military defoliated the fields of fire between the

front-line defensive positions and the south-barrier fence. The size of the treated area was

a strip of land 151 miles long and up to 350 yards wide from the fence to north of the

"civilian control line." There are no records that reflect spraying within the DMZ itself.

Agent Orange and other herbicides were applied through hand spraying and by hand

distribution of pelletized herbicides. Although restrictions limited the potential for spray

drift, run-off, and crop damage, records indicate that effects of spraying were sometimes

observed as far as 200 meters down wind.

Units in the area during the period of use of herbicide include: the four combat brigades of

the 2nd Infantry Division (1-38 Infantry, 2-38 Infantry, 1-23 Infantry, 2-23 Infantry, 3-23

Infantry, 3-32 Infantry, 109th Infantry, 209th Infantry, 1-72 Armor, 2-72 Armor, 4-7th

Cavalry); and 3rd Brigade of the 7th. Infantry Division (1-17th Infantry, 2-17th Infantry, 1-73

Armor, 2-10th Cavalry). Field Artillery, Signal, and Engineer troops were supplied as

support personnel as required. The estimated total number of exposed personnel is

12,056.

For purposes of claims for service connection, if a veteran is determined to have been

exposed to Agent Orange in Korea or in other recognized areas (e.g., Panama), then the

presumption of service connection for the listed diseases applies.

Special Compensation for 10 Diseases: As with veterans of any period, Vietnam veterans

with disabilities arising during or aggravated by military service may receive monthly VA

compensation. As knowledge has grown from studies of Agent Orange, some latent

diseases that may not have become evident in service have been recognized

presumptively. Based on clinical research, 10 such diseases are now on the presumptive

list: chloracne, Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, porphyria

cutanea tarda, respiratory cancers (lung, bronchus, larynx and trachea), soft-tissue

sarcoma, acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy, prostate cancer and spina bifida.

Compensation, health care and vocation rehabilitation services are provided to Vietnam

veterans' offspring with spina bifida, a congenital birth defect of the spine. Vietnam

veterans are not required to prove exposure to Agent Orange; VA presumes that all

military personnel who served in Vietnam were exposed to Agent Orange.

 

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I would like to thank Taura King, Marilyn Oilver, Barb Wright, Tom Courbat and many others that have supplied this info.

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WASHINGTON - Veterans exposed to herbicides while serving along the demilitarized zone (DMZ) in Korea will have an easier path to access quality health care and benefits under a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) final regulation that will expand the dates when illnesses caused by herbicide exposure can be presumed to be related to Agent Orange.
Under the final regulation published today in the Federal Register, VA will presume herbicide exposure for any Veteran who served between April 1, 1968, and Aug. 31, 1971, in a unit determined by VA and the Department of Defense (DoD) to have operated in an area in or near the Korean DMZ in which herbicides were applied.
 
In practical terms, eligible Veterans who have specific illnesses VA presumes to be associated with herbicide exposure do not have to prove an association between their illness and their military service.  This "presumption" simplifies and speeds up the application process for
benefits and ensures that Veterans receive the benefits they deserve.
 
Click on these links to learn about Veterans' diseases associated with Agent Orange exposure at
http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/diseases.asp and birth defects in children of Vietnam-era Veterans
_defects.asp>  at
 
VA encourages Veterans with covered service in Korea who have medical
conditions that may be related to Agent Orange to submit their
applications for access to VA health care and compensation as soon as possible so the agency can begin processing their claims.
 
Individuals can go to website
<http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/21/AO/claimherbicide.htm>  to get a more complete understanding of how to file a claim for presumptive conditions related to herbicide exposure, as well as what evidence is needed by VA to make a decision about disability compensation or survivors benefits.
 
Additional information about Agent Orange and VA's services for Veterans exposed to the chemical is available at
 
The regulation is available on the Office of the Federal Register website at http://www.ofr.gov/.

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THE AUSTRALIAN KOREAN WAR VETERANS' HEALTH STUDY

Chemical burial confirmed in Camp Carroll

Agent orange development procedures for in country-brown water-blue water-korea-thailand

Over 100 Kinds of Chemicals Dumped at Camp Carroll

Korea AO Exposure

USFK investigating vets' claims they buried Agent Orange on base in '70s at Camp Carroll Korea

Military forms joint team to investigate Camp Mercer site

USFK officer battles with VA over Agent Orange exposure

New Procedures for Claims Based on Herbicide Exposure in Thailand and Korea

Check Your Claims Status On Line

Obtaining Missing Documents

Instructions for verifying a Veterans involvement in Special Operations Forces classified missions or obtaining related classified documents.

Korea Demilitarized Zone Incidents

Military Research Associates

The Federal Registry needs your input

Herbicide Exposure and Veterans With Covered Service in Korea

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If you are a Veteran with Korean Service and have questions, health problems or just want to share your experiences which may have exposed you to toxic herbicides, please e-mail  Phil Steward  at pesteward@hotmail.com .

Korean Service Questionnaire

Contact your Congress people to support this bill.

Agent Orange Equity Act of 2009.

Parkinson Disease

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The Invisible Army..Ghost Walkers

Up date on Ghost Walkers records.
It seems that they are under lock and key at the Pentagon. Someone tried to get  records and was politely told to go and forget that he came looking for the records.  I Think it's now congressional investigation time and I think that I will be calling both Filner's office and my local congressional guy as well as Danial Akaka's office and everybody else that I can think of that might be able to jar these records loose.  44 years is long enough to keep something hidden and covered up.  Wonder how many other vets out there were involved in one of the 22,000 still classified missions
that need to get their benefits established? 

Requesting classified records for those who were on classified missions.

Korean War Project Agent Orange Registry

Letter to Representative Bob Filner

Second Indianhead Division Association, Inc.

Agent Orange Press Release

Agent Orange Clinic

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On December 16, 2003 the Veterans Benefits Act of 2003 was signed into law. This law states that Spina Bifida benefits have been extended to the natural child of a service member if the service member served in Korea during the period September 1, 1967 - August 31, 1971. The veteran must have served in the active military, naval or air service and have been exposed to an herbicide agent during such service in or near the Korean demilitarized zone.

http://www.va.gov/hac/forbeneficiaries/spina/spina.asp

Now this is my question. If Spina Bifida is recognized by the VA as caused by AO, then doesn’t this tell you that any vet that was in Korea in the time period mention above should also have been exposed and get their claims approved.

M21 Manual on Herbicide Exsposure

Establishing Service Connection for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Herbicide Agents

Introduction of Evidence

Letter of Support

Letter of Support 2

Letter of Support 3

Letter From DVA

Letter from Steve Witter

Leavenworth Papers

Rachel's Environment and Health

1/31st, 2/31st ID Korea

Toxic Defoliant

1st Cav

DMZ 2nd ID

VABVA Case Law

Agent Orange, Korea VA Directive

AGENT ORANGE Outside of Vietnam, Korea:

Australian Korean War Vets

Chemical Toxins

CHRONOLOGY OF INCIDENTS

Histories for The Second Korean War Veterans

More on Korea

National Agricultural Library

Study finds high pollution levels at most U.S. bases in S. Korea

Tactical Herbicides

US Dept. of Health and Human Services

Joe's Story

Rain Eagles Story

Agent Orange, Korea VA Directive

AGENT ORANGE Outside of Vietnam, Korea:

The below 3 books is the Tactics and Techniques of Chemical, Biological and Radiological (CBR) Warfare issued by Headquarters, Department of the Army issued November, 1958.  The Official Record Stamp is dated December 23, 1958 and the document # is AGO 1979C-Oct

Book 1

Book 2

Book 3

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The VA does have significant information regarding Agent Orange use in Korea along the demilitarized zone (DMZ). DoD has confirmed that Agent Orange was used from April 1968 through July 1969 along the DMZ. The military defoliated the fields of fire between the front-line defensive positions and the south-barrier fence.

The size of the treated area was a strip of land 151 miles long and up to 350 yards wide from the fence to north of the "civilian control line." There are no records that reflect spraying within the DMZ itself.

Agent Orange and other herbicides were applied through hand spraying and by hand distribution of pelletized herbicides. Although restrictions limited the potential for spray drift, run-off, and crop damage, records indicate that effects of spraying were sometimes observed as far as 200 meters down wind.

Units in the area during the period of use of herbicide include:

the four combat brigades of

the 2nd Infantry Division (1-38 Infantry, 2-38 Infantry, 1-23 Infantry, 2-23 Infantry, 3-23 Infantry, 3-32 Infantry, 109th Infantry, 209th Infantry, 1-72 Armor, 2-72 Armor, 4-7th Cavalry); and 3rd Brigade of the 7th. Infantry Division (1-17th Infantry, 2-17th Infantry, 1-73 Armor, 2-10th Cavalry). Field Artillery, Signal, and Engineer troops were supplied as support personnel as required. The estimated total number of exposed personnel is 12,056.

For purposes of claims for service connection, if a veteran is determined to have been exposed to Agent Orange in Korea or in other recognized areas (e.g., Panama), then the presumption of service connection for the listed diseases applies.

 

                                                

                 

Some Links Require Excel Viewer...Get It Free Here

Map of Korea from Tom C

1968 Map of Korea

20th General Support

BVA Camp Casey

Camps and Towns

Camp Market

DMZ Units

Historical Documents of Interest to Veterans

History of the US Army Materiel Support Center - Korea

Korea A Tour Of Duty

Map Area 1

Map

Map 2

Sources of InformationRegarding Units in Korea and Elsewhere

Where AO was Used

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Agent Orange Guam

Guam Contamination New Site

Guam and Johnston Atoll

Personal Stories

cross island fuel pipeline that I sprayed with Agent orange, agent white and agent blue from sept 1968 to jun 1978

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Agent Orange Clinic

Agent Orange Press Release

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE YIGO, GUAM

ATSDR

Dioxins on Guam

Guam and Agent Orange Site

Gulf Port and Guam

Military Research Associates

Testimony of Bert Schreiber

Operation Crossroads 1946

Cocos Island and Lagoon

Blue Ribbon Panel Committee Action Report

Conclusion

Statement of Contamination

The planes were kc 130's and 135's cargo planes, Almost all the planes were going to Vietnam some were going to OKINAWA, THAILAND.

We loaded helicopters only when we were making a new supply yard and I have a picture that shows a field after we sprayed it. We did used a vehicle most of the time a truck with a sprayer in the back, but you had to hold the sprayer by hand. I have two pictures that I want you to look at,1 is the field after we sprayed and the other is one of the yards with the drums  AO and AW.  The drums are marked orange rings for AO, white rings for Agent White, and blue rings for Agent Blue.

 

The below two links are the pictures.

Truck and Forklift

Agent Orange Drums

GUAM.... THE LAND OF THE ROSARIES

Dump Sites

AGENT ORANGE Outside of Vietnam, Guam:

Agent Orange, Guam 2

Agent Orange, Guam 3

Base Catalyzed Decomposition

 

 

PLACE WHERE AGENT ORANGE WAS STORED

 

Places AO was Stored

Places that Stored AO and Who Knew

AO In Guam, Okinawa and Thailand

Dioxin Found in Some Italy Mozzarella

Dioxin in Michigan

Dioxin Midland

Dioxin in Missouri

Chemicals Used In Military Operations During The Vietnam War

Dioxin Report

DoD Report on Herbicides Used Outside of Vietnam

Study Links Pesticides With Parkinson's

TOXNET on 2-butoxyethanol

US Military Bases Known to be Contaminated

Percutaneous absorption of 2-butoxyethanol vapour in human subjects

2-butoxyethanol

 

 C6H14O2/CH3(CH2)2CH2OCH2CH2OH 

           Poison!

This is the chemical make up of  2-butoxyethanol and in this article I will refer to it as 2-B.

This was used extensively in Vietnam and in the Gulf and also to clean up the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska.

This lady has done extensive research on and about the effects of 2-B. Please review her pages as there is much information on this chemical and others.

Health Effects of Military who served in Vietnam

Many vets today suffer the effects that this chemical causes and the VA or any other medical institution are not treating these symptoms  as they need to.

This is the chemical that gulf war vets were exposed to in the family of 2-B
  • ethyl alcohol in what they cleaned equipment with; 
  • 2-butoxyethanol or ethylene glycol monobutyl ether; and 
  • diethylene glycol monobutyl ether 
It causes all the symptoms that have come to be known as 'gulf war syndrome' given enough exposure (which isn't hard in war time and with the stronger concentrations.)

There is one chemical, that with overexposure, causes all of these:

This link explains what 2-butoxyethanol does from the Material Safety Data Sheets ...
Also make note ... that this chemical is in widespread use today.
AVOID it at all costs

WARNING

Was It The Flu Or 2-B

Also of interest, you may want to check out this link.

How many Americans died in wars ?

More Info on 2-B in pdf format

 I would like to thank Margaret Diann for giving me permission to use her information and to share with you the links to her site. She has done a great service for all those that are effected by this chemical.

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